mnky
Staff
Guidelines
Investor Guide
New Free Market
Bookmarks
TQRspeak
Archives
Blogge
Login
FAQ

Stories are our businessTM

PDF Print E-mail
Article Index
Page 2
Page 3
Page 4
Page 5
Page 6
Page 7
Page 8

Nidhi Singh attended American International School, Kabul before moving to Delhi University for BA English Honors. Currently, she lives with her husband near McLeodganj (abode of the Holy Dalai Lama.) Many of her short stories have appeared internationally in magazines and anthologies such as Rigorous, Fantasia Divinity, Fiction on the Web, Storyteller, TWJ Magazine, Indie Authors Press, Flyleaf Journal, Liquid Imagination, Digital Fiction Publishing Co, LA Review of LA, Flame Tree Publishing, Four Ties Lit Review, The Insignia Series, Inwood Indiana Press, Bards and Sages Publishing, Scarlet Leaf Review, Bewildering Stories, Down in the Dirt, Mulberry Fork Review, tNY.Press, Fabula Argentea, Aerogram, Fiction Magazines, Flash Fiction Press, The Dirty Pool, Asvamegha, etc. She has also authored translations of several Sikh holy scriptures.”

MINCEMEAT ORIGINS

Well, many of my stories come from my dreams. When I have a bad dream, I know I'll have a good story in the morning. I dreamt once that a man on waking discovers a whole lot of meat in his kitchen and has no clue thereafter how he came by it.

I woke up and jotted the idea down.

Vegetarianism is very popular in India because of religious beliefs, and meat eating is generally associated with Muslims, who happen to dominate the butchering trade here. One thing followed another, and I added some cultural details, the celebrations associated with Eid, and popular practices in the community.

I nearly made it a magical tale, with the ‘Farishtey,’ or angels giving away the dowry money in the end to the protagonist. But that seemed too convenient, and it wouldn't portray the hero in an honest, conscientious light, so I let better sense on the part of the father prevail. He himself was born in a wedlock between first cousins, which is a common practice in their society, and consequently suffered from genetic defects. He, therefore, wouldn’t want the same to happen to his daughter, or that she be married off to an older man with a harem. That conclusion seemed more logical, believable, and man-contrived.

I wanted to convey the message that good things do happen to good people after all and that they can control their destiny if they have a little divinity in them.